Tomorrow’s News Reports: Broadcasters Are Focused on the Cloud for a Hybrid Future, Part 5
The newsroom as we knew it prior to 2020 will never be the same. The pandemic’s impact forever changed how news is gathered and distributed, accelerating modernization and flexibility.  
 
To learn about the changes taking place, the DPP—the media industry’s business network—launched the Tomorrow’s News initiative, gathering 50+ contributors from major news organizations across Europe, the Americas, and Australasia.  
 
The project was co-sponsored by Avid and other organizations. As a news solution provider for three decades, Avid helps news production teams adapt to changes in how news is created and consumed. Avid’s unified media production platform, MediaCentral, connects teams, tools, and media to create more content across more channels with speed and efficiency.  
 
The results of the discussions were compiled into a three-part comprehensive set of reports—What’s the News?, The News Business, and Making the News—that details the conversation about the newsroom of the future and how to prepare for it.  
 
This article is the fifth installation in a series of articles—summary report, newsroom collaboration, business efficiency, remote and distributed working, and cloud and hybrid working—that provide an overview of the comprehensive DPP reports.  
 
The following highlights how cloud and hybrid working are changing news production. 
 
Why the cloud? 
 
The pandemic accelerated the use of cloud strategies as companies were forced to go remote and figure out how to keep employees connected, engaged, and productive in the new quarantined world. Many looked to the cloud to create new collaborative and remote workflows.  
 
News organizations are increasingly recognizing the power and flexibility of the cloud. There are expanded options available to broadcasters including new providers, suppliers, and talent not accessible otherwise. The cloud offers solutions for optimizing hybrid news production workflows and increasing productivity with reduced operational and maintenance costs. The move to the cloud is often an enabler for the move to software tools which connect together more seamlessly.  
  
Reflecting on the report, Avid Product Evangelist, Craig Wilson, says, “What we are seeing is an opening up of the possibilities of what the cloud can deliver. The pandemic forced people to adopt ideas that perhaps in the past they would have been hesitant to try.” 
 
Benefits of the cloud 
 
When combined with cellular and internet video contribution, cloud technology brings a new level of flexibility to hybrid news production
 
“For the first time ever, we’ve lost the hard dependency on the newsroom. Now when we look at contribution links, we’re not so wedded to the geographic location. As our resources move to the cloud, they can be anywhere,” says JJ Eynon, Engineering Manager, Warner Bros., Discovery, CNN. 
 
Cost has been a concern for companies considering switching their workflow to the cloud, but the cloud allows for experimenting without great financial risk. Cloud service allows for pay as you go, reducing expenditures on operations, maintenance, infrastructure, storage, networking, and security.   

Another area of unease with cloud technology is security. Storing all media in one repository—including automation, playout capability, and news production—has actually strengthened security. The cloud creates a harmonized, standardized model with a central point to drive consistency. 

Live production in the cloud is now becoming realistic too. Solutions to technical challenges with bandwidth and synchronization are emerging.  
  
Avid’s Craig Wilson says, “Customers are assessing what makes sense to move to the cloud and what makes sense to remain on-premises. We see this as an ongoing process.” 

While core broadcast knowledge, media management, and news technology capabilities remain fundamental, extending those areas of knowledge into the cloud requires subject matter experts who understand how cloud technologies affect each of those spaces. To be truly successful with this technology, companies need to invest in training their people in how to operationalize in the cloud.  
 
Finding the right people and answers 
 
While core broadcast knowledge, media management, and news technology capabilities remain fundamental, extending those areas of knowledge into the cloud requires subject matter experts who understand how cloud technologies affect each of those spaces. To be truly successful with this technology, companies need to invest in training their people in how to operationalize in the cloud.  

As Avid has continued its journey to delivering cloud solutions, Avid brought in people with cloud knowledge, including from industries other than media. It’s a competitive market for that skillset but necessary to operationalize media workloads to the cloud and complement existing staff experts in audio and video. 

“It’s really about collaboration without boundaries,” says Avid Product Evangelist, Craig Wilson. 
 

Benefit from cloud and hybrid news production.

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